34.16 Duplicate Photos

20220122

Duplicates of photos readily occur as we copy photos around on our storage and attempt to manage large collections of photos with different file naming schemes.

Duplicate photos can readily be found using fdupes (see Section17.5). With no options fdupes lists groups of duplicated files in the specified directory:

$ fdupes .

./20180323_122434_02.jpg
./20180323_122434_01.jpg
./20180323_122434_00.jpg

./20030102_092312_03.jpg
./20031012_092312_00.jpg

./20200531_151245_01.jpg
./20200531_151245_00.jpg

With -r (--recurse) sub-directories are included. A summary of duplicates is obtained with -m (--summarize):

$ fdupes --summarize .

13567 duplicate files (in 6407 sets), occupying 16996.0 megabytes

Deleting duplicates with fdupes will retain the first listed within each group. Using --reverse and --order= by name might be useful for filenames that differ by numerals, so keeping the lowest numbered file. Explore with order to get what best works for you.

$ fdupes --order='name' --reverse .

./20180323_122434_00.jpg
./20180323_122434_01.jpg
./20180323_122434_02.jpg

./20031012_092312_00.jpg
./20030102_092312_03.jpg

./20200531_151245_00.jpg
./20200531_151245_01.jpg

The following command will delete duplicates, keeping the first listed in each group:

$ fdupes --delete --noprompt --order='name' --reverse .

   [+] ./2020/20200926_063024.jpg
   [-] ./camera/20200926_063024.jpg
   [-] ./todo/20200926_063024.jpg


   [+] ./2020/20201114_061818.jpg
   [-] ./camera/20201114_061818.jpg
   [-] ./todo/20201114_061818.jpg


   [+] ./2020/20201003_051104.jpg
   [-] ./camera/20201003_051104.jpg
   [-] ./todo/20201003_051104.jpg


   [+] ./2020/20201114_062446.jpg
   [-] ./camera/20201114_062446.jpg
   [-] ./todo/20201114_062446.jpg

...


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